ACblog

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When Americans Think About Energy, The Environment Matters As Much As Affordability

fastcompany:

The American political atmosphere might be polarized when it comes to climate change, but new evidence suggests that the public is more passionate about energy’s impact on the environment than one might think.

A new survey from the University of Michigan Energy Institute found that 60% of respondents worried “a great deal” or a “fair amount” about the environmental impact of energy use. By comparison, 55% worried a great deal or fair amount about energy affordability. The two concerns, researchers say, were basically equivalent.

"That was an eye opener for us," says professor John DeCicco. “I wouldn’t have guessed that we would have gotten, statistically speaking, an equally strong response.” More>

Good news for the planet.

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newsweek:

At 58, Bill Gates is not only the richest man in the world, with a fortune that now exceeds $76 billion, but he may also be the most optimistic. In his view, the world is a giant operating system that just needs to be debugged.

Gates’ driving idea – the idea that animates his life, that guides his philanthropy, that keeps him late in his sleek book-lined office overlooking Lake Washington, outside Seattle – is the hacker’s notion that the code for these problems can be rewritten, that errors can be fixed, that huge systems – whether it’s Windows 8, global poverty or climate change – can be improved if you have the right tools and the right skills. 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the philanthropic organization with a $36 billion endowment that he runs with his wife, is like a giant startup whose target market is human civilization. 

Bill Gates: The Rolling Stone Interview | Culture News | Rolling Stone

newsweek:

At 58, Bill Gates is not only the richest man in the world, with a fortune that now exceeds $76 billion, but he may also be the most optimistic. In his view, the world is a giant operating system that just needs to be debugged.

Gates’ driving idea – the idea that animates his life, that guides his philanthropy, that keeps him late in his sleek book-lined office overlooking Lake Washington, outside Seattle – is the hacker’s notion that the code for these problems can be rewritten, that errors can be fixed, that huge systems – whether it’s Windows 8, global poverty or climate change – can be improved if you have the right tools and the right skills.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the philanthropic organization with a $36 billion endowment that he runs with his wife, is like a giant startup whose target market is human civilization.

Bill Gates: The Rolling Stone Interview | Culture News | Rolling Stone

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If you’re going to get anywhere in learning mathematics, you need to learn to be comfortable not understanding something… The truth is that mathematicians are chronically lost and confused. It’s our natural state of being, and I mean that in a good way.
Jeremy Kun on why mathematicians are, and should be, “chronically lost and confused.” Pair with the wonderful Love and Math. (via explore-blog)

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theatlantic:

The Unsung Glory of the Mile Run

In 2001, Alan Webb was a senior at South Lakes High School in Reston, Virginia. He was also a distance runner who’d been winning races and breaking records since his freshman year. On May 27th, at a track meet in Oregon, Webb ran a mile in three minutes and 53.43 seconds. 
He had broken four minutes in the mile before, clocking a 3:59.86 indoors on January 20, 2001, at the New York City Armory. The sub-4-minute mile is a hallowed mark that, to this date, separates the pros from the amateurs in middle-distance running. Only five high-school runners have ever done it: Jim Ryun was the first, in 1964, and he eventually set the high-school mile record at 3:55.3. No scholastic athlete could best that, until Webb came along. 3:53 is now the fastest mile an American high-school athlete has ever run. 
Read more. [Image: Daniel Maurer/AP]

theatlantic:

The Unsung Glory of the Mile Run

In 2001, Alan Webb was a senior at South Lakes High School in Reston, Virginia. He was also a distance runner who’d been winning races and breaking records since his freshman year. On May 27th, at a track meet in Oregon, Webb ran a mile in three minutes and 53.43 seconds. 

He had broken four minutes in the mile before, clocking a 3:59.86 indoors on January 20, 2001, at the New York City Armory. The sub-4-minute mile is a hallowed mark that, to this date, separates the pros from the amateurs in middle-distance running. Only five high-school runners have ever done it: Jim Ryun was the first, in 1964, and he eventually set the high-school mile record at 3:55.3. No scholastic athlete could best that, until Webb came along. 3:53 is now the fastest mile an American high-school athlete has ever run.

Read more. [Image: Daniel Maurer/AP]

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Got to see one of my heroes, Paul Farmer, at UMD speaking about leadership in global health equity and human rights.  Paraphrasing a line of his, “Sustainability in public health should only be applied to sustainability of passion and sustainability of leadership”.

Got to see one of my heroes, Paul Farmer, at UMD speaking about leadership in global health equity and human rights.  Paraphrasing a line of his, “Sustainability in public health should only be applied to sustainability of passion and sustainability of leadership”.

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Buffett Makes Millions Selling 500-to-1 Monkey-Linked Derivatives