ACblog

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nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable. 
KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

nprbooks:

Libraries in many big cities often serve as de facto homeless shelters — a place for people living on the streets to find quiet and warmth — and it can make others, there to just check out books or videos, uncomfortable.

KQED’s Scott Shafer reports that’s why the San Francisco Public Library has hired a full-time social worker. She spends her days roaming the library floors, keeping an eye out for regulars who look like they could use her help. And sometimes she hires the formerly homeless patrons she’s helped, like Joe Bank, to do outreach under her supervision.

(via newsweek)

21 notes

When Americans Think About Energy, The Environment Matters As Much As Affordability

fastcompany:

The American political atmosphere might be polarized when it comes to climate change, but new evidence suggests that the public is more passionate about energy’s impact on the environment than one might think.

A new survey from the University of Michigan Energy Institute found that 60% of respondents worried “a great deal” or a “fair amount” about the environmental impact of energy use. By comparison, 55% worried a great deal or fair amount about energy affordability. The two concerns, researchers say, were basically equivalent.

"That was an eye opener for us," says professor John DeCicco. “I wouldn’t have guessed that we would have gotten, statistically speaking, an equally strong response.” More>

Good news for the planet.

225 notes

newsweek:

At 58, Bill Gates is not only the richest man in the world, with a fortune that now exceeds $76 billion, but he may also be the most optimistic. In his view, the world is a giant operating system that just needs to be debugged.

Gates’ driving idea – the idea that animates his life, that guides his philanthropy, that keeps him late in his sleek book-lined office overlooking Lake Washington, outside Seattle – is the hacker’s notion that the code for these problems can be rewritten, that errors can be fixed, that huge systems – whether it’s Windows 8, global poverty or climate change – can be improved if you have the right tools and the right skills. 

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the philanthropic organization with a $36 billion endowment that he runs with his wife, is like a giant startup whose target market is human civilization. 

Bill Gates: The Rolling Stone Interview | Culture News | Rolling Stone

newsweek:

At 58, Bill Gates is not only the richest man in the world, with a fortune that now exceeds $76 billion, but he may also be the most optimistic. In his view, the world is a giant operating system that just needs to be debugged.

Gates’ driving idea – the idea that animates his life, that guides his philanthropy, that keeps him late in his sleek book-lined office overlooking Lake Washington, outside Seattle – is the hacker’s notion that the code for these problems can be rewritten, that errors can be fixed, that huge systems – whether it’s Windows 8, global poverty or climate change – can be improved if you have the right tools and the right skills.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the philanthropic organization with a $36 billion endowment that he runs with his wife, is like a giant startup whose target market is human civilization.

Bill Gates: The Rolling Stone Interview | Culture News | Rolling Stone

695 notes

If you’re going to get anywhere in learning mathematics, you need to learn to be comfortable not understanding something… The truth is that mathematicians are chronically lost and confused. It’s our natural state of being, and I mean that in a good way.
Jeremy Kun on why mathematicians are, and should be, “chronically lost and confused.” Pair with the wonderful Love and Math. (via explore-blog)

(Source: explore-blog)